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an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing our country. you've likely heard it before. we, the questioners often ask, well, what would reagan do? it's a good question to ask, because while times and technology and many faces have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those that speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today, governor jeb bush, understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remains an extremely important national voice in th
for ronald reagan's election when he got to the administration then he became a republican. and in the administration he became embroiled in the contra scandal. the attended brandeis and another east coast mostly white school which didn't help the feelings of alienation. she joined the communist party usa and rose to national prominence when she went head-to-head with governor ronald reagan in california when the border regions fired her from her position ask professor for her membership in the communist party. she was then very soon after. back in the 70's was remarkable she was charged with murder and kidnapping and conspiracy in connection with an attempt to jailbreak in the marlene county courthouse in the northern california. she went underground to avoid capture and she was captured and spent 18 months in prison before her trial which was covered the world over. so i will just feed you one more piece from that. this is when she gets captured. entering the motel in the late afternoon, angela noted in passing a dark suit and men in the lobby. she took down the now famil
but under president ronald reagan's watch it is the first thing people associate with the name. she was free elective accept of course for the relatives of those who died in beirut to it's hard to say how it will affect her legacy that it continues to be associated with her time in office. >> host: thank you for the book and for the interview. >> guest: thank you for having me. was a pleasure. >> got was "after words," booktv signature program which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. good booktv.org and click on "after words" in the book tv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> jeffrey frank recounts the personal and working relationship between president dwight eisenhower and vice president richard nixon. mr. frank reports nixon constantly sought eisenhower's approval while eisenhower was unsure of mix and's
, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise that there would be law enforcement, and we would restore the rule of law and a million people would be legalized. but then from there on forward the law would be enforced. well, i made sure i kept my records right waiting for the ins to show up at my office, but i never saw them. neither did thousands of businesses. but the enforcement in re began era was greater than the enforcement in any succeeding administration, and now the law is so eroded, i sat in a hearing just a couple of days ago and heard la raza say, well, we want to provide comprehensive immigration reform, and after we restore the rule of law -- la raza's telling us they're restoring the rule of law by waiving it? they've eroded the rule of law. and republicans seem to forget of the 11 or 12 million that they say are here -- and i think it's 20 -- t
could label the republicans or start with ronald reagan, cut taxes, big chunk toss the wealthy and then borrow the money to pay the bills. that's how you get debt, $2 trillion, $3 trillion, $4 trillion. ronald reagan had this concept, starve the beast. he said the way we're going to kill social security and medicare and medicaid, we're at right now, is to make this government's debt so big that we can't afford them. >> guest: absolutely. one second, sir. ronald reagan was never in support of killing any of those programs. i mean, that is hyperbole. >> caller: he wanted to tax on the wealthy. let me finish, please, you get -- >> guest: he cut taxes across the board, sir, on everybody. >> caller: start to filibuster because i'm going to hammer you with a question. he lored the tax on the wealthy from 70 down to 40, and that amounted over the 30 years trillions and trillions of dollars being given away to the wealthy. do you think there's a correlation between us being trillions and trillions of dollars in the hole and the fact we gave trillions and trillions of dollars away to th
on? i said this is she. [laughter] hello? and it was ronald reagan and he said sandra, how about that? first name basis. [laughter] i said yes mr. president, he said i would like to announce your nomination tomorrow for the supreme court, is that okay with you? [laughter] that is quote-unquote what happened. [laughter] and i said yes, mr. president, i think it is. so that's what happened. he had sent three people from the attorney general's office to check on my record for i had served in some capacity in all three branches of the arizona state government in the preceding years and of course, i have left the track record and i think the president had sent people out to uncover the press coverage of anything i was involved with and to look at papers in connection with a record. i guess they had not uncovered anything to looks scary so he decided to do that. i was at home the day they've wanted to come now to talk to me. my husband and i had built a sun-dried adobe house in the phoenix area 1957. that was a challenge you could buy the other kind but in this country today it is very hard
a conservative face on, but the truth is coming out now. >> talk from your perspective about the ronald reagan and his belief in god and non- churchgoing that we saw, and bill clinton, who has spoken out about god and churchgoing and family and all that. i mean, how do people deal with this? >> yeah, it's fascinating. i asked former vice-president quayle in an interview i did th him recently. i said, "you know, you, dan, are a churchgoing, bible-carrying presbyterian, and bill clinton is a churchgoing, bible-carrying baptist. so why is it that you differ on social issues?" i dot think he'd ever been asked that question before. he kind of flubbed it. he said, "well, i think it's a difference of interpretation." that's the short answer, and i think that's probably true. do i wish that reagan had gone to church more and exhibited more in his own life and family some of the things that he believed? well, sure, of course. i wish i did. i wish i exhibited in my life more consistently more of the things that i say and believe. but i don't know. it mystified me because-- mmy carter, you know, was anot
the nra in this period is in favor of verse directions on the 2nd amendment and ronald reagan and -- pushed through their right to restrict to bear arms and made this political power possible. but this really puts the party on the map. the delegation of panthers go to the assembly and protest this legislation. they go armed where the laws passed in newspapers all over the world wrote about the black panther party. this is huey p. newton at the wicker throne. i won't have time to talk in detail about a lot of the pictures. another key piece about the black and the party did, the idea wasn't it came right out of malcolm x. if you compared with malcolm x's 1953 program there is an important difference but there's a lot of development. the idea is that the black panther party were the legitimate representatives of the black community. the community had to govern in our own interest and we will take that honor make that happen. the idea was not just about standing up to the police. it never was from the beginning. the party was very much about creating stewardship and self governan
the system. so as ronald reagan said at that time when they were basically three soviet leaders in a little over three years time, they keep dying on me. [laughter] and that's what i think president obama and future american presidents are going to be dealing with. certainly here in the next four years. they have no ability to agree yet on the son of one of these brothers, because the 36 branches each year that if my son gets it, your son, your whole branch is disenfranchised because we will pass it down in our branch because it is not, it was easy to pass a from brother to brother, but how do you decide if you going to pass it from cousin to cousin, which cousin, when there are hundreds of them? the king tried to get around that by having an allegiance council with one person from every branch of the family that would decide, but when his first crown prince die, that group apparently met and one of the brothers said, i should be the next crown prince, and the king said no, i'm picking another brother. and that wasn't the end of one man one vote within the royal family. they never had the v
when she went head to head with governor ronald reagan in california when the board of regents fired her from her first position as a professor for her membership in the communist party. she was then very soon after, actually, again the concentration of events in these people's lives in the '70s is remarkable. she was charged with murder and kidnapping and conspiracy in connection with an attempted jailbreak in the marin county courthouse in california. she went underground to evade capture, she was captured and spent 18 months in prison before her trial which was covered the world over. so i'll just read you one more piece from that. this is when she gets captured. reentering the motel in the late afternoon, angela noted dark-suited men milling about the lob by. she tamped down the now-familiar feeling of panic that spread through her. she was probably imagining things, angela told herself. the stress of life as a fugitive had taken its toll. at this point every white man in a suit seemed to her like an fbi agent ready to pounce. resolutely, she made her way across the lobby and int
of democrats and ronald reagan agreed to in the 1980's which is to clean out some of these outlandish special interest tax breaks tax breaks. and i see my good friend, senator levin, here tonight and he is going to outline just some of those outlandish tax breaks. we ought to clean them out and use a portion of those dollars to hold down the rates and keep progressivity. and in the two years after democrats and republicans did that, in the 1980's the country created millions of new jobs. no one can say every one of them was due to that tax reform effort, but it certainly helped. and we had senator enzi on the floor earlier this evening, and i've been working with her on something that i think really has been missed in the tax reform debate and that is senator enzi has said when are people going to start talking about the transition rules that you would need to actually implement the tax reform plan, because today in a global economy, and senator murray and i come from a part of the world that's so trade sensitive, here we've got senator enzi talking about something very practical that ought t
about the relationship between richard nixon and ronald reagan during those years? >> there wasn't much. i mean, nixon didn't have much respect for reagan. he didn't think he was all that bright. i don't think he did much -- i think is putting more involved and other ministry should i had a personal experience with nixon when i lived in "washington post." i was in the outlook section, and this is when the first george bush was president, and we were saying, they're saying maybe he's not quite getting the arrival of yeltsin. i said why do we get richard nixon to write a piece for us. they said he will never utter the "washington post." and by gosh, he wrote of these. it was a pretty good one. i came in and i said we need to work up we called his office the next morning. i can't believe i spoke to. he was up all night working on it, and so we ran it. apparently, i was told it had some influence that brent scowcroft like the peace and gave it to president bush and it was a part of his policy. >> another question over here. >> thank you very much. my name is terry stevenson to either questi
principles fighters. at cpac 32 years ago ronald reagan attributed his victory to a set of principles, principles which were protected and nourished by a few unselfish americans through many grim and heartbreaking defeats. the reality today is grim and heartbreaking. we have so many reasons to be encouraged because we have unselfish americans around this country who are protecting and nourishing our principles. [applause] examples, examples like senator rand paul -- [cheers and applause] congressman louie gohmert. [cheers and applause] and a few steadfast, stalwart, principled fighters on capitol hill. and we have unselfish americans around this country. examples like our warriors in wisconsin who have been on the front lines fighting -- [inaudible] [applause] examples like michael -- [inaudible] jo ann terry -- [inaudible] who helped coordinate our efforts to defend representative democracy in their state as governor scott walker stood and acted on principle. [cheers and applause] one patriot stood at a town hall and challenged president obama questioning his demonization of the tea
on the corporate side from 46% down to 34%. that was 1986. it was done in a bipartisan way. with ronald reagan and tip o'neill. and the idea at that time was to take our tax rate down to the point where it was competitive, meaning it was below the average of our global competitors. in the intervening 2 1/2 decad decades, guess what's happened? every single country of the developed world, the so-called oecd countries, our global trading competitors, every single one of them have gone in and reform theied their tax cod. they've lowered their rates but they've also made their code more competitive. every single country except us. so america's been on the sidelines while other countries have moved quickly to improve their tax code. why? because they want investment, they want the jobs. and what's happened is, sure enough, they're more competitive, capital is now flowing outside of this country, we're losing headquarters, we're in a situation where if there's a foreign acquisition to be made, those companies in foreign countries have an advantage because they have a more competitive tax code. our t
of "ronald reagan: the power of conviction and the success of his presidency," a great book which should be read by every student of the u.s. presidency. of "competitive equity: a better way to organize mutual funds." "privatizing fannie may, freddie mac and the home loan banks," we're still working on that, and "the gap gap." here's our book. i hope you read this whole book, but in case you're intimidated by the thickness of it, please in any case read the closing chapter on the burdens and blunders of the dodd-frank act. it is a succinct, compelling case for the prosecution with dodd-frank in the doc to which the jury of time will surely respond guilty and the judge pronounce sentence, string 'em up. peter will present his book. in about 25 minutes we'll have three discussants, we'll give peter a chance to respond and some discussion among the panel, then we'll open the floor to your questions. and at 1:45, unless we run out of questions sooner, we'll adjourn to a coffee reception. copies of peter's book are available at no cost. should we run out and you don't have one yet, you can si
't add up long term. they agree with that much as president ronald reagan and speaker tip o'neill agreed with the very same notion back in 1982 and 1983. the numbers weren't adding up long term for social security, and something had to be done. and some painful decisions had to be made in the early 1980's. and to this day we thank god for president ronald reagan and speaker tip o'neill for having the bipartisan courage to do the tough things to make the tough decisions and adjust an important program so that social security has been saved for the past three decades. we need that kind of statesmanship out of the white house today. frankly, we need that kind of leadership out of the white house. you know, we're calling for bipartisan action. i think it's worth noting -- and it pains me to say this -- for the first time in 92 years we are considering a budget without seeing a plan from the president of the united states. he announced just last week that he was just going to wait in sending us his budget plan. it will be two months late by the time it arrives, according to the president's ow
. when ronald reagan came in and we didn't have any money, we watched every dime we spent. former deputy attorney general of the united states, larry thompson of atlanta, and i was united states attorney in alabama, we were such dyed in the wool reaganauts, when we went to a conference, we roomed together, separate beds. we thought it was cheaper. it would save money for the taxpayers. this kind of mentality needs to get back into what we are doing. i would just say that it's time for us to confront it. the vision of the members of this side and i think a lot of members of that side is not that far apart. i want to be clear about a couple of things. this budget needs to be put on a path to balance. it can be done without cutting spending in any dramatic way. all you have to do is reduce the rate of growth in spending. the budget will balance in ten years. we need to do that. we need to plan to do that. as i explained before, the debt is already pulling down economic growth in america. it's pulling down the growth that we have. the debt has reached such a level, 104% of g.d.p., our gross
on second amendment, and, um, ronald reagan and the assembly pushed true this legislation -- through this legislation to restrict the right to bear arms and make this initial strategy of policing the police that had built political power, um, the panthers had used to build political power impossible. but this really, this puts the party on the map. chairman seale and a delegation of panthers go to the assembly and protest this legislation. they go armed. this is before the law is passed. and newspapers all over the country, all over the world all of a sudden know about the black panther party. this is huey newton and the wicker throne. i'm not going to have time to talk in detail about a lot of these picture cans. i want to make a few key points. another key piece of what the black panther party did, if you look at the program and compare it with malcolm x's 1963 program, there's some important differences, but there's a lot of learning and development, right? the idea is that the black panther party said we are the legitimate representatives of the black community. the united states
's been. right now already, it's the highest this rate has been since ronald reagan inherited a disastrous tax code from jimmy carter. that was a long time ago. of course, that doesn't include the state and local taxes which put many americans today at a top marginal tax rate of over 50%, where government is taking over half of the income that they are earning, and our friends who are introducing this budget are suggesting that all this isn't enough. we need yet another big tax increase. in fact, we need a giant one. $1.5 trillion over the next ten years in new additional taxes. i've got news for you. i don't see how this can probably be done without significant tax increases on middle-class americans. i know some folks in this chamber like to suggest that can all be done just by soaking the rich again. we just go back to soaking rich folks again. i will give you an example why i don't think that can work. the president made out in his budget last year his plan for a new whole round of taxes on wealthy americans on top of the tax increase that occurred 11 weeks ago, and he specified how he
since ronald reagan but our current president today, it is endorsed by republicans and democrats in this body. the person that knows the knows about it is miss jeanne shaheen, a former governor of new hampshire and a united states senator. mrs. shaheen: thank you, mr. president. i was governor for three budgets and we were able to balance them every other year, every cycle, because biennial budgeting gives us an opportunity to prioritize scarce resources and provide more oversight to the budgeting process. this is an idea whose time has come. we need this reform, and i urge my colleagues to support it. mr. isakson: i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? mrs. murray: is there a senator who wishes to speak in opposition? seeing none, i will yield back our time. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators wishing to vote or to change their vote? if not, the yeas are 68, the nays are 31. the amendment is agreed to. mrs. murray: mov
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20